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Hydropower

Hydroelectric Power Generation

Hydropower uses the flow of water to generate electricity. Technologies range from in-conduit turbines to run-of-river, to large dams and impoundment structures. While hydropower does not consume water, it requires water for its operation, which can impact the availability of water for ecosystems, agriculture and other industries. Larger hydropower facilities require significant land area and can impact land availability.

Resources CESC

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Tools and Websites

Energy-Water Nexus Crosscut

The Energy-Water Nexus Crosscut Team (originally called the Water-Energy Tech Team) was formed in late 2012 to address these issues.…

Sources:

U.S. Department of Energy

Publication

Multi-objective Optimization for Analysis of Changing Trade-offs in the Nepalese Water-Energy-Food Nexus with Hydropower Development

This report proposes a spatially explicit framework that couples two well-established water and power system models to develop a decision…

Sources:

Water (journal)

Date:

24 February 2017

Publication

Modeling the Hydropower-Food Nexus in Large River Basins: A Mekong Case Study

The hydropower-food supply nexus in the Mekong River basins is assessed here in an influence model. This shows how altering…

Sources:

Water (journal)

Date:

28 September 2016

Publication

Hydropower Versus Irrigation: An Analysis of Global Patterns

While reservoir operations for hydroelectricity production might support irrigation, there are also well-known cases where hydroelectricity production reduces water availability…

Sources:

Environmental Research Letters

Date:

28 February 2017

Publication

Water-Energy-Food Nexus in a Transboundary River Basin: The Case of Tonle Sap Lake, Mekong River Basin

This article shares the experiences with using a nexus approach in Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake area. It concludes that water,…

Sources:

Water

Date:

12 October 2017

Publication

Transferable Principles for Managing the Nexus: Lessons from Historical Global Water Modelling of Central Asia

The complex relationships within the water-energy-food security nexus tend to be place-specific, increasing the importance of identifying transferable principles to…

Sources:

Water

Date:

31 July 2015

Publication

Chinese State-Owned Enterprise Investment in Mekong Hydropower: Political and Economic Drivers and their Implications Across the Water, Energy, Food Nexus

This paper examines the political and economic drivers surrounding Chinese state-owned enterprise (SOE) activities in Mekong Basin hydropower, and the…

Sources:

Water

Date:

6 November 2015